Diabetes & Obesity

Diabetes & Obesity

Obesity is the leading cause of preventable death worldwide, and more and more children and adults are affected by it. Some authorities consider it the most serious public health problem of our time. Obesity is associated with many diseases, including heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Additionally, rates of type 2 diabetes are on the rise, perhaps due to a modern lifestyle that is more sedentary and a modern diet that is high in processed foods, refined grains and sugar.

Having type 2 diabetes means that your body doesn't make enough insulin, or doesn't properly use the insulin your body makes. Insulin helps your body's cells use glucose, the body’s main energy source. Typically, with type 2 diabetes, the body still makes insulin, but its cells can't use it due to insulin resistance.

It is a common misunderstanding that in order to lose weight and control blood sugar (whether you have diabetes or not), you must avoid carbohydrates. In fact, certain kinds of carbohydrates, called complex carbohydrates, are very important to good health.

Complex Carbohydrates, Glycemic Index & Glycemic Load

Complex carbohydrates are a good source of energy for those who want to lose weight. Additionally, they slow digestion, moderate blood insulin and blood sugar levels, as well as reducing cholesterol levels.

Not all carbohydrate foods are created equal, in fact they behave quite differently in our bodies. The glycemic index describes this difference by ranking carbohydrates according to their effect on our blood glucose levels. Low glycemic index foods produce only small fluctuations in blood glucose and insulin levels. Low glycemic index foods reduce your risk of heart disease and diabetes.

The glycemic index (GI) is a numerical system of measuring how much of a rise in circulating blood sugar a carbohydrate triggers. The higher the number, the greater the blood sugar response. So a low GI food will cause a small rise, while a high GI food will trigger a dramatic spike. A GI of 70 or more is high and a GI of 55 is low. Most whole grain rice has a medium to low glycemic index.

The glycemic load (GL) is a relatively new way to assess the impact of carbohydrate consumption that takes the glycemic index into account, but gives a fuller picture than does glycemic index alone. A GI value indicates how rapidly a particular carbohydrate turns into sugar. What it doesn’t indicate is how much of that carbohydrate is in a serving of that particular food. For example, the carbohydrate in watermelon has a high GI. However, there isn’t much of it, so watermelon's glycemic load is relatively low. A GL of 20 or more is high and a GL of 10 or less is low.

Whole grain rice has an extremely low GL, around 4 or so. Thus, it produces only small fluctuations in blood glucose and insulin levels. Low GI and low GL foods reduce the risk of heart disease and diabetes. Additionally, they help keep your energy level balanced by slowly sending glucose into the blood stream. They help you feel fuller longer and are the key to sustainable weight loss.

Additionally, low glycemic index carbohydrates help keep your energy level balanced by slowly sending glucose into the blood stream. They help you feel fuller longer and are the key to sustainable weight loss.

How Whole Grains Help Diabetes and Weight Control
  • Reduce the risk of heart disease
  • Improve diabetes control
  • Increase the body's sensitivity to insulin
  • Reduce blood cholesterol levels
  • Reduce hunger and keep you fuller for longer
  • Helps you lose and control weight

All of our whole grain rices provide these benefits.

Links to Scientific Research